Following the Flag Charles Carelton Coffin

ISBN: 9781492355199

Published: September 6th 2013

Paperback

214 pages


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Following the Flag  by  Charles Carelton Coffin

Following the Flag by Charles Carelton Coffin
September 6th 2013 | Paperback | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, AUDIO, mp3, ZIP | 214 pages | ISBN: 9781492355199 | 4.51 Mb

The battle of Bull Run, or of Manassas, as the Rebels call it, which was fought on the 21st of July, 1861, was the first great battle of the war. It was disastrous to the Union army. But the people of the North were not disheartened by it. TheirMoreThe battle of Bull Run, or of Manassas, as the Rebels call it, which was fought on the 21st of July, 1861, was the first great battle of the war.

It was disastrous to the Union army. But the people of the North were not disheartened by it. Their pride was mortified, for they had confidently expected a victory, and had not taken into consideration the possibility of a defeat. The victory was all but won, as has been narrated in My Days and Nights on the Battle-Field, when the arrival of a brigade of Rebels and the great mistake of Captain Barry, who supposed them to be Union troops, turned the scale, and the battle was lost to the Union army.

But the people of the North, who loved the Union, could not think of giving up the contest, -of having the country divided, and the old flag trailed in the dust. They felt that it would be impossible to live peaceably side by side with those who declared themselves superior to the laboring men of the Free States, and were their rightful masters. They were not willing to acknowledge that the slaveholders were their masters.

They felt that there could not be friendship and amity between themselves and a nation which had declared that slavery was its cornerstone. Besides all this, the slaveholders wanted Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri in the Southern Confederacy, while the majority of the people of those States wanted to stay in the Union.

The Rebels professed that they were willing that each State should choose for itself, but they were insincere and treacherous in their professions. Kentucky would not join the Confederacy- therefore they invaded the State to compel the people to forsake the old flag. A gentleman from Ohio accompanied a Southern lady to Columbus, on the Mississippi, to see her safely among her friends. General Polk was commander of the Rebel forces at that place, and they talked about the war.

I wish it might be settled, said the General. How will you settle? O, all we ask is to have all that belongs to us, and to be let alone. What belongs to you? All that has always been acknowledged as ours. Do you want Missouri? Yes, that is ours. Do you want Kentucky? Yes, certainly. The Ohio River has always been considered as the boundary line. But Kentucky dont want you. We must have her. You want all of Virginia? Of course. You want Maryland? Most certainly. What will you do with Washington? We dont want it. Remove it if you want to- but Maryland is ours.1 Such was the conversation- and this feeling, that they must have all the Slave States to form a great slaveholding confederacy, was universal in the South.

Besides this, they held the people in the Free States in contempt. Even the children of the South were so influenced by the system of slavery that they thought themselves superior to the people of the Free States who worked for a living. I heard a girl, who was not more than ten years old, say that the Northern people were all old scrubs! Not to be a scrub was to own slaves, -to work them hard and pay them nothing, -to sell them, to raise children for the market, -to separate mothers from their babes, wives from their husbands, -to live solely for their own interests, happiness, and pleasure, without regard to the natural rights of others.

This little girl, although her mother kept a boarding-house, felt that she was too good to play with Northern children, or if she noticed them at all, it was as a superior.



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